Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies

Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies (E-ISSN: 2149-1291) is a peer-reviewed and biannual online international journal and it is an interdisciplinary academic journal, JECS publishes theoretical, methodological and empirical research from all disciplines dealing with ethnicity and culture. Concerned primarily with critical reviews of current research, JECS enables a space for questions, concepts and findings of formative influence in ethnic and cultural studies. The journal accepts article submissions online or by e-mail.



jets The scopes of the journal include:

  • Education
  • Identity Politics
  • Minorities
  • Race
  • Ethnicity
  • Immigration/Migration
  • Diaspora
  • Multicultural Education
  • Popular Culture
  • Cultural Studies
  • Transnationalism
  • Citizenship and Policies of Integration;

The journal is included in:

  • Crossref
  • DOAJ
  • EBSCO Publishing Inc
  • EconLit
  • Electronic Journals Library (EZB)
  • ERIH PLUS
  • Google Scholar
  • J-Gate
  • JournalTOCs
  • Open J-Gate
  • Open Science Directory
  • PKP Open Archives Harvester
  • ProQuest Education Index
  • ScienceGate
  • SFU Library
  • Ulrich's
  • WorldCat
  • SCOPUS (accepted)

Statistics

  • 2018 Q1: Articles Received: 21; Accepted: 12; Rejected: 10; Published: 8; Retracted: 0
  • 2017 Q2: Articles Received: 27; Accepted: 14; Rejected: 13; Published: 11; Retracted: 0
  • 2017 Q1: Articles Received: 15; Accepted: 6; Rejected: 9; Published: 6; Retracted: 0
  • 2016 Q2: Articles Received: 14; Accepted: 3; Rejected: 11; Published: 2; Retracted: 0

------------------------------------------

Open Access Policy:

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

Copyright Policy:

By submitting a manuscript to JECS, authors agree to transfer without charge the following rights to JECS upon acceptance of the manuscript: first worldwide publication rights and the right for JECS to grant permissions as JECS editors judge appropriate for the redistribution of the article, its abstract, and its metadata in professional indexing and reference services. Any revenues from such redistribution are used solely to support the continued publication and distribution of articles. The journal/publisher is not responsible for subsequent uses of the work.

------------------------------------------

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.

Paper Selection and Publishing Process

a) Submission Acknowledgement

When you submit a manuscript online, you will receive a submission acknowledgment letter sent by the online system automatically. For email submission, the editor or editorial assistant sends an e-mail confirmation to the submission’s author within one to three working days. If you fail to receive this confirmation, please check your bulk email box or contact the editorial assistant.

b) Basic Review

The editor or editorial assistant determines whether the manuscript fits the journal’s focus and scope. Next, a check for the similarity rate is done using CrossCheck, powered by iThenticate. Any manuscripts out of the journal’s scope or containing plagiarism, including self-plagiarism, are rejected.

Description: http://www.ejecs.org/public/site/images/Hamdi/iThenticate_Logo2.jpgDescription: http://www.ejecs.org/public/site/images/Hamdi/13.jpg

c) Peer Review

We use a double-blind system for peer review; both reviewers’ and authors’ identities remain anonymous. The submitted manuscript will be reviewed by at least two experts: one editorial staff member as well as one to three external reviewers. The review process may take two to four weeks.

d) Decision Is Made

The decision to accept or reject an article is based on the suggestions of reviewers. If differences of opinion occur between reviewers, the editor-in-chief will weigh all comments and arrive at a balanced decision based on all comments, or the second round of peer review may be initiated.

e) Notification of the Result of Review

The result of the review will be sent to the corresponding author and forwarded to other authors.

f) Publication Notice

The authors and readers will be notified and invited to visit our website for the newly published articles.

Call for Papers- Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies

Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies (JECS) welcomes original research articles and book reviews for its next issue. The JECS is a biannual and peer-reviewed journal published in June and December.

We are seeking submissions for forthcoming issue published in December 2018. The paper should be written in professional English. The length of 6000-10000 words is preferred. All manuscripts should be prepared in MS-Word format, and submitted online: http://www.ejecs.org/index.php/JECS/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions or sent to: info@ejecs.org

For any further information about the journal, please log on its website: http://www.ejecs.org/index.php?journal=JECS&page=index

Submission Deadline: October 15, 2018


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Call for Papers

Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies

Special Issue: Kurdish Diasporas and New Social Locations: Making Sense of Displacement and Community Building

 

Guest editors: Stanley Thangaraj, City College of New York

Aynur de Rouen, Binghamton University

 

      Kurdish communities have a long history of displacement, marginalization, and persecution in the Middle East/West Asia. They are the largest ethnic community without a state of their own. They have faced multiple oppressions at the hands of Western, Arab, Turkish, and Persian actors. There is now an emergence of vibrant scholarship on Kurdish diasporas in Europe, as there are large communities in Germany, Sweden, and England. However, little research has emerged in interrogating the diversity of Kurdish diasporic lives outside of Europe. Kurdish communities spread throughout the globe, in both the global north and the global south. For instance, the city of Nashville in the state of Tennessee in the United States has one of the largest community of Kurds outside of Kurdistan. Similarly, there are growing communities across Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India, and other locations. Accordingly, each specific physical location provides very important historicities, social locations, and diverse lived experiences of diasporic Kurds that challenges the idea of singular or equivalent Kurdish identities. With the emerging literature on Kurds and Kurdistan, we emphasize the importance of Kurdish diasporic communities in new destination sites as important resources in understanding how Kurdistan is negotiated multiply, contradictorily, and in other unpredictable fashions. For example, the various locations of Kurdistan in legible national frames of Turkey, Iraq, Iran, and Iraq have also meant that forced national education systems with language mandates in Turkish, Arabic, and Persian has created different linguistic registers for Kurdish diasporas to make sense of their communities.  

       Yet, the particularity of diasporic lives also show the different and differential relationships to Kurdistan, the various constructions of Kurdistan, and the lived experiences in host nations.  As a result, a careful investigation of multiple Kurdish diasporas provides terrain for interrogating how diasporas form in relation to the host nation, to imagined contours of Kurdistan, and in relation to other Kurdish diasporic communities. The relationship between history, migration, and community building remains nuanced and complex.  On the one hand, it offers ways to think about long histories of resistance and challenge. On the other hand, it also offers us ways to talk about the complexities and problematics of community building that may inadvertently and intentionally create its own sets of subjugation and exclusion. 

   This special issue aims to explore the changing social and cultural landscape ofKurdishdiaspora by engaging with many diasporic sites as a way to complicate understandings of diaspora, Kurdistan, and local lived experiences of identity. Through established and emerging theoretical perspectives, and original empirical studies, the objective of the volume is to provide a critical (re-)examination of the roles that new locations and social histories have indifferently inflecting Kurdish identity across various diasporic sites. In the process, we aim to trouble, complicate, and challenge conceptualizations of “diaspora.” We invite paper proposals and abstracts that critically engage with Kurdish diasporas in new destination sites or previous understudied place. Though by no means limited to these questions, we anticipate that papers might address the following topics:

 

  • How do multiple lived experiences and different forms of migration as well as residence link the various sites and communities of diaspora and homeland(s)? How do localized performances of Kurdish identity and host national identity facilitate imaginaries of “home” within the diaspora? 
  • In what ways do these new locations facilitate the construction and articulation of “new ethnicities” / diasporic Kurdish identities? 
  • How do the various social locations and lived experiences complicate and multiply inflect Kurdish identity? What is the relation of host nation, lived experiences, and visions of Kurdistan?
  • How are femininities, masculinities, queer identities and other forms of intersectionality articulated through Kurdish communities? 
  • What are the implications of the “War on Terror”, empire and neoliberal politics for citizenship and community building in the Kurdish diasporas?
  • How do the ISIS campaigns and Turkish state violence become a means of negotiating longer histories of trauma, pain, struggle, creativity, and possibility in Kurdish diasporas?
  • What role does race play out in not only deciphering localized experiences in host countries but also in the Kurdish diasporic imagination of Kurdistan?
  • What are the creative and many performative ways of expressing Kurdish identity across categories of race, gender, sexuality, language, class, ability, and ethnicity in the Kurdish diaspora?

Final submissions can be:

  • Full lengtharticles (6,000 to 7,500 exclusive of references) that theoretically and/or empirically attend to walking methodologies (these will be double blind peer reviewed)

The journal is an open source online journal that currently publishes the papers as pdf files. Images and URL links can be included in submissions. All proposals will be submitted electronically as word documents, using APA citation format. Please send the manuscript to Stan Thangaraj (City College of New York) and Aynur de Rouen (Binghamton University) at stan.thangaraj18@gmail.com and aderouen@binghamton.edu.   If you have any questions, please do reach Stan and Aynur at the e-mail addresses posted above. 

 

Deadlines:

November 15, 2018: Proposal/expression of interest (250 words plus 50-word bio)

December 01, 2018: Authors will be notified of acceptance of their proposal

February 1, 2019:  Final submissions due for blind peer review, once comments and reviews are given back in 6 weeks, the final revised version should be submitted by April 30, 2019

Publication date: August 2019

 


 





 

Announcements

 
No announcements have been published.
 
More Announcements...

Vol 5, No 1 (2018)

Table of Contents

Editorial

Editorial
Hasan Aydin
PDF
i-v

Original Manuscript

Daniel Ian Rubin
PDF
1-15
Kashif Raza
PDF
16-26
Alexandre Emboaba Da Costa
PDF
27-40
Jessica N. Essary, Tunde Szecsi
PDF
41-57
Kelly Kato
PDF
58-73
Mehmet Karakus
PDF
74-84
Leon Monroe Miller
PDF
85-93
Bohsiu Wu, Aya Kimura Ida
PDF
94-109